U. S. EISA 2007 (Energy Independence and Security Act)

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The Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (H.R. 6), also known as EISA 2007, was signed by President Bush in December, 2007 to move the United States toward greater energy independence and security

While the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 is a comprehensive document covering issues ranging from fuel economy standards for cars and trucks to renewable fuel and electricity to training programs for a "green collar" workforce, it also sets the first federal mandatory efficiency standards for appliances and lighting.

Highlights of the some of the appliance and lighting standards are shown below. For more detailed information, please follow the links included at the bottom of this page.

Efficiency Standard for External Power Supplies (EPS) ≤ 250 Watts*

To go to the DOE Rulemaking for Battery Chargers and External Power Supplies Energy Conservation Standard page, click here.

February 10, 2014 Update – The Department of Energy has published a revision to its efficiency requirements for EPSs. For a copy of the rulemaking, click here. For a copy of the Technical Support Document, click here. For a copy of the international marking protocol, click here. The new regulation makes a differentiation between “direct operation” and “indirect operation” power supplies. A direct operation EPS is one which operates its end application (not a battery charger) without the assistance of a battery. An indirect operation EPS is one that can’t operate a product (not a battery charger) without the assistance of a battery. A process is included in the regulation to determine whether an end product is considered direct or indirect in operation. Indirect operation products are not affected by the new tighter requirements and only have to comply with the current EISA2007 efficiency limits after February 2016.

Active Mode Energy Consumption (Effective through February 15, 2016)

Nameplate Output Power (Pno) Minimum Average Efficiency in Active Mode (expressed as a decimal)
0 to < 1 watt ≥ 0.5 * Pno
≥ 1 watt to ≤ 51 watts ≥ 0.09 * Ln (Pno) + 0.5
> 51 watts ≥ 0.85

No-load Energy Consumption (Effective through February 15, 2016)

Nameplate Output Power (Pno) Maximum Power for No-load
All ≤ 0.5 watts

* Manufactured on or after July 1, 2008

New EISA2007 EPS Efficiency Requirements Effective February 16, 2016

Table 1. 2016 Direct Operation EPS - Single Voltage Output Efficiency Requirements

Nameplate Output Power (Pno)1
No-Load Mode Power
Nameplate Output Power (Pno)
Average Efficiency in Active
Mode2
0 to ≤ 49 W AC-DC: ≤ 0.100
AC-AC: ≤ 0.210
0 to ≤ 1 W Basic Voltage: ≥ 0.5 * Pno + 0.16
Low Voltage3: ≥ 0.517 * Pno + 0.087
> 1 to ≤ 49 W Basic Voltage: ≥ 0.071 * ln(Pno) − 0.0014
* Pno + 0.67
Low Voltage3: ≥ 0.0834 * ln(Pno) −
0.0014 * Pno + 0.609
> 49 to ≤ 250 W ≤ 0.210 > 49 to ≤ 250 W Basic Voltage: ≥ 0.880
Low Voltage3: ≥ 0.870
> 250 W ≤ 0.500 > 250 W ≥ 0.875

Table 2. 2016 Direct Operation EPS - Multiple Voltage Output Efficiency Requirements

Nameplate Output Power (Pno)1
No-Load Mode Power
Nameplate Output Power (Pno)
Average Efficiency in Active Mode2
Any ≤ 0.300 0 to ≤ 1 W ≥ 0.497 * Pno + 0.067
> 1 to ≤ 49 W ≥ 0.075 * ln(Pno) + 0.561
> 49 W ≥ 0.860
Notes for tables:
  1. Pno is the Nameplate Output Power of the unit under test
  2. “ln” refers to the natural logarithm
  3. A low-voltage model is an EPS with nameplate output voltage < 6 V and output current ≥ 550 mA. A basic-voltage model is an EPS that is not a low-voltage model

Efficiency Standard for Battery Chargers

March 8, 2012 Update – The Department of Energy has issued a Notice of Proposed Rule (NOPR) for battery chargers and external power supplies. For a copy of the NOPR, please click here. To go to the DOE Rulemaking for Battery Chargers and External Power Supplies Energy Conservation Standard page, click here.

The DoE has published new test procedures for Battery Charger Systems, becoming effective July 1, 2011. For a copy of the test procedure notification, go to:
http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2011-06-01/html/2011-12595.htm

Lighting Energy Efficiency

This section details lamp efficiency standards with effective dates starting on 1/1/2012.

U. S. Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007
(Complete text of the bill. After downloading the file, go to Section 301 ffor Appliance and Lighting Standards).

Department of Energy Solid-State Lighting Standards Page - Summarizes DOE's role in accelerating the development and implementation of SSL standards.

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