Other Europe


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Agency: Blaue Engel/Blue Angel
Location: Germany

Blaue Engel is a labeling scheme operated by a consortium of German governmental and non-governmental agencies. It covers hundreds of products with energy efficiency criteria similar to ENERGY STAR. Blaue Engel requires standby power consumption to be listed in a product's manual. Currently there are approximately 3800 certified Blue Angel products and services in Germany and abroad.


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Agency: European Commission's Code of Conduct
Location: Throughout European Union

The European Commission's Code of Conduct consists of several voluntary agreements with associations of manufacturers and the EU trade association EACEM. Previous codes of conduct have included TVs, VCRs and audio equipment. Recent focus has been on External Power Supplies, Digital TV Services, and Broadband Equipment.


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Agency: European Commission's Eco-Label
Location: Throughout European Union, also Norway, Liechtenstein, and Iceland

Implemented by the European Union Eco-Labeling Board with representatives from all participating countries, the EU Eco-Label scheme has created ecological criteria for a number of different product groups and has awarded hundreds of products the EU Flower. Criteria is reviewed approximately every three years.


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Agency: European Commission's IPP Mobile Device Charger Rating
Location: Throughout European Union

The European Commission's Integrated Product Policy (IPP) program and the world's top five cellphone makers have introduced a voluntary energy rating system for mobile device chargers, making it easier for consumers to determine which ones use the least energy. This rating system covers all chargers currently sold by Nokia, Samsung, Sony Ericsson, Motorola and LG Electronics, and ranges from five stars for the most efficient chargers down to zero stars for the units consuming the most energy.


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Agency: Nordic Ecolabel
Location: Norway, Sweden, Finland, Iceland, Denmark

The official eco-labeling system for the Nordic countries. It is a voluntary and neutral seal-of-approval certification program, which was introduced in 1989, as an attempt to unify the emerging eco-labeling programs throughout the Nordic countries. The green swan symbol now has high consumer recognition and respect, covering over 60 product groups. The label is usually valid for three years, after which the criteria is revised and the company must reapply.